Baltimore

How is Boston 1771 different from Baltimore 2015?

Simple. It’s not.

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This famed act of American colonial defiance served as a protest against taxation. Seeking to boost the troubled East India Company, British Parliament adjusted import duties with the passage of the Tea Act in 1773. While consignees in Charleston, New York, and Philadelphia rejected tea shipments, merchants in Boston refused to concede to Patriot pressure. On the night of December 16, 1773, Samuel Adams and the Sons of Liberty boarded three ships in the Boston harbor and threw 342 chests of tea overboard. This resulted in the passage of the punitive Coercive Acts in 1774 and pushed the two sides closer to war.

This action, part of a wave of resistance throughout the colonies, had its origin in Parliament’s effort to rescue the financially weakened East India Company so as to continue benefiting from the company’s valuable position in India. The Tea Act(May 10, 1773) adjusted import duties in such a way that the company could undersell even smugglers in the colonies. The company selected consignees in Boston, New York, Charleston, and Philadelphia, and 500,000 pounds of tea were shipped across the Atlantic in September.

Patriots destroyed private property in 1771 Boston in revolt of the unjust laws imposed upon its citizens by a ruling class oblivious to their condition, who promulgated law after law to enrich their buddies in the East India company, while criminalizing similar activity by the individual citizens of Boston.

Fast forward, more than two centuries later, and the same thing is happening in Baltimore and every other inner city, where communities are isolated into bantustans and treated like nothing more than captive markets – cash cows, where the rich get richer and the poor get further impoverished.

“Just envision a debtor’s prison being run by a collusion between city officials, police and court judges, who treated our community like an ATM machine,” Tyler said. “Because that’s all they did. Ferguson is in St. Louis County. It’s 21,000 people living in 8,100 households. So it’s a small town. Sixty-seven percent of the residents are African-American. Twenty-two percent live below poverty level. A total of $2.6 million [were paid in fines to city officials, the courts and the police] in 2013. The Ferguson Municipal Court disposed of 24,532 warrants and 12,018 cases. That’s about three warrants per household. One and a half cases for each household. You don’t get $321 in fines and fees and three warrants per household from an average crime rate. You get numbers like this from racist bullshit, arrests from jaywalking, and constant low-level harassment involving traffic stops, court appearances, high fines and the threat of jail for failure to pay.”

Not to mention the king of all cash crimes – “drug possession” – the crime for which Freddie Gray paid with his life. Meanwhile for the non-crime of peddling deadly pharmaceuticals, Big Pharma is awarded riches beyond their imagination.

Something’s gotta give. Those who make peaceful evolution impossible, make violent revolution inevitable.

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